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The Essences of Indoor Cycling by Dennis Mellon

Where the Art, Science and Technology of Indoor Cycling Converge

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Fitness News

Stages Flight & The Detroit Pistons

Detroit Pistons Team News

Source: Detroit Pistons

 



 

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Colorado Classic: a breakdown of the men’s cycling stages

MEN’S STAGE BREAKDOWN Stage 1 – 1:10 p.m. Thursday (approximate finish 4:40 p.m.), Colorado Springs. 93.5 miles, 5,934 feet of elevation gain. Professional road cycling returns to the Pikes Peak region for the first time since 2014. The route being used to christen the Colorado Classic is a familiar one for local fans and some of the riders, with all of the roads having been raced during the USA Pro Challenge. Cyclists will ride six 15.5-mile laps. Prime viewing spots include downtown – site of the start and the finish – Garden of the Gods and Old Colorado City. Expect multiple attacks early to spawn a breakaway. But a single rider or a small group likely won’t be able to hold off a hard-charging peloton to

Source: Colorado Classic: a breakdown of the men’s cycling stages

Colorado Classic roster includes some of the biggest names in cycling

Colorado Classic hosting pro cycling’s top athletes, including Taylor Phinney, Rigoberto Uran, Brent Bookwalter, Evan Huffman and Daniel Jaramillo

Source: Colorado Classic roster includes some of the biggest names in cycling

Tour Tech 2017: Power meters of the peloton

Source: Tour Tech 2017: Power meters of the peloton    

Check out how the pros are measuring power in this year’s Tour de France: SRM, Stages, 4iiii, power2max, Quarq…

Becoming a Spin Instructor Taught Me to Love Myself

A post shared by Emily Abbate (@emilyabbate) .

Sweat dripped down my face as Beyoncé blared overhead. My cadence was off-beat. As my cheeks grew red, I lost my words, looking out in front of me to an empty room. Then it happened: I broke down. Overcome with emotion, I began to wonder if I’d ever be able to get this whole Spin instructor thing down. I wondered if maybe I was making a mistake

You see, at the beginning of the year, I lost my full-time job as a fitness editor when they shuttered the magazine I was working for. I hit the ground running, navigating the world of full-time freelance writing and editing, but I had so many questions. What would be next move? What would be my best move? Just over a month later, I found myself in talks with a cycling studio called Swerve I’d been going to for years. As a certified personal trainer and run coach, I thought being a Spin instructor could be right up my alley. And at this particular studio, where teamwork and community are key, it felt like an opportunity that was too good to pass up.

So I did it. I rallied up the courage, stopped asking myself “what am I doing?”, and auditioned. In that first stint, it immediately felt right. I got the sense that this would be a place where I could connect with others. This would be a place where I’d take on my next adventure. This would be a place where I could learn about myself. But little did I know at that moment just how much I’d learn.

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Setup Timeout Error: Setup took longer than 30 seconds to complete.
Here’s the thing. I’m a perfectionist. I’d also never taught a Spin class. I live my life by the mantra that all it takes is all you’ve got. Getting the call that they wanted me to train to become an instructor, having never done it before, was enthralling. The training program, though? It was grueling. For give-or-take six weeks, I learned everything from proper bike setup and how to structure a playlist to form cuing and how to command a room.

At Swerve, the class is divided into three teams competing against one another. You have a couple of different ways to earn extra points for your team, via sprinting past the beat of the music and “Swerving to the beat” (that’s holding the RPM — or revolutions per minute). Both of those involve using a special technology that’s unique to the studio, all while cuing everything from bike positioning to cadence. It’s . . . a lot. But it’s a lot of fun, too. The team aspect fosters togetherness. Being part of a community of athletes like the one at Swerve meant that I had to put in my time. I had to learn all of the special tech’s in and outs so that I could best lead a class. (Have I mentioned I’d never done this before?)

I was giving it all I had. Hour after hour, whether I was working with the studio’s head of training or talking to myself in an empty studio, I was learning. But still, I was missing cues. Despite dedicating so much time to this new skill, I kept feeling like I was failing. I kept feeling overwhelmed. I kept feeling . . . stuck.

I remember that breakdown day in the studio like it was yesterday. I removed myself from the bike. Looking down at my bright red leggings, I had my moment. I thought of an interview I had done with Olympian Dawn Harper-Nelson about a year earlier. On the phone, we talked about her spill at the World Athletic Championships in Beijing. She told me about how she felt ruined after tripping over that. She was overcome. Despite wanting to run and hide from the media, she persisted. We talked about the lesson she learned that’s stuck with me: in times of difficulty, it’s important to have your moment. You don’t work hard to fail. You work hard because you’re passionate. You work hard because you care. So when things don’t go your way, when mistakes happen, have your moment to appreciate the frustration and how you feel. Then, reflect. She encouraged told me to ask myself: why is it that the mistake happened? What is it that you can learn, and how will you best move forward?
Related
7 Things Your Fitness Instructor Wishes You Knew

For the zillionth time, I confronted my reality: Spin was something I’d never done. Being good at this was going to take time. Just because I wasn’t perfect off the bat didn’t mean that I couldn’t be great. It didn’t mean that I didn’t have potential. It didn’t mean I wasn’t working hard.
So I began to accept the mishaps. Instead of getting choked up when things went wrong, I grew to appreciate the chaos and learn how to incorporate small flukes into the swing of things. I began to realize that the small errors I was making may have been blaring to me but unnoticeable to everyone else. I started to realize that in time, with practice, I was getting into the swing of things.

One day, everything clicked. My demo ride, where you invite a bunch of good friends to hit the saddle and squad up for a little practice ride, was the next day. I set up in the studio by myself and ran through my entire playlist. By the fifth song, no mess-ups, no frustration, just this feeling of accomplishment. And the next day, in front of 24 close friends, I did it. I lead my first class, nearly bursting into tears the second the final song came to a close. Surrounded with love, I’d done something I wondered if I was even capable of doing in the first place. And the best part? I did it well.
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Here’s What Happened After I Ran a 5K Every Morning For a Week

A slew of classes in, I’m proud of myself. I’m proud to report that I haven’t burned down the studio. I’m proud to report that I encouraged my mom to take her first Spin (slash boutique fitness class). I’m proud to report that I am part of an amazing team. I’m proud to report that I’ve learned to love myself, flaws and all. It was never that I wasn’t good enough to do this. It was I’ve come to learn that during the hard times when you want to give up, you’ve gotta dig deep. Challenges emerge in life because we are capable of handling them. We are capable of the growth necessary for moving forward. Now that I’ve risen to this one, I can’t wait to see what’s next.

Source: Becoming a Spin Instructor Taught Me to Love Myself

Equinox – INTRODUCING THE WORLD’S FINEST INDOOR BIKES

INTRODUCING THE WORLD’S FINEST INDOOR BIKES

We’ve partnered with Stages Indoor Cycling to bring the most technologically advanced indoor bike to Equinox, setting your success in motion with the smoothest, smartest and strongest ride of your life.

Simple and fast bike adjustments allow you to refine your ride from posture to pedal stroke. Reliably accurate data puts your performance into perspective. Designed with an unmatched outdoor road feel, your cycling experience is as elevated as your highest goals.

BELT DRIVE

A carbon-fiber belt replaces the bike’s chain for the most efficient and silent transfer of energy, delivering the most natural road feel.

SPRINT SHIFT

Adjust gear resistance to build workload rapidly or gradually, or drop it instantly to recover between power intervals.

HARD DATA

Whether counting calories or logging in-depth stats, the StagesPowerTM meter ensures the most accurate results from the most competitive workouts.

PERSONAL POWER

More than just measuring your power, the EcoSCRNTM stats-crunching computer display feeds off your physical output to give you more detailed input.

COMFORT ZONE

Easier to set up for a harder workout, the Stages SC3 indoor bike for Equinox is engineered for maximum comfort and ergonomic efficiency.

Source: Fitness Regeneration, Active Regeneration – Regeneration at Equinox

How to Get Started Training with Power | TrainingPeaks

Everything you need to know to get started training with power—from understanding key metrics to learning how to set and maintain your functional threshold.

Training with a power meter is the absolute best way to get the most out of both your training time and effort. Unlike heart rate-based training, power allows us to measure the muscular demands of the effort instead of just the aerobic. The metrics-based approach to training that power provides is invaluable in helping athletes reach their goals, but what is it that we need to focus on, and how do we decipher all of the available information when one wants to get started training with power?

There are a few key places we can direct our attention to begin to understand the information generated from our power meters, and how to best utilize it to inform the decisions we make regarding training prescription.

What is Threshold?

In order to grasp and apply power metrics to our training we first need to understand the foundation on which everything is built: threshold. Threshold is simply the maximum wattage (power) you can maintain while your body can still remove the lactic acid being produced by your working muscles.

It’s also the point at which your body begins to recruit greater amounts of fast-twitch muscle fiber. Working for longer periods of time above your threshold creates the familiar “burn” in the legs as a result of accumulating lactic acid. Athletes can increase their body’s lactic acid clearing potential by spending significant time training in specific ranges below and right at threshold.

Time in these ranges also trains the body to slow the rate of carbohydrate utilization. Once you understand the concept of threshold we can take it a step further with FTP (Functional Threshold Power). FTP is the linchpin of power-based workouts, and the key to executing them properly.

Setting and Maintaining FTP

By now you’re no doubt at least familiar with FTP, how it impacts your training approach and your overall performance on the bike. However, knowing what produces a strong and accurate FTP, how to establish it, and how maintain it are vital to keeping your training on track.

Setting your FTP, or rather producing efforts that yield the results you want, takes some practice and know how. With tools like TrainingPeaks and WKO4 we can understand and analyze power numbers more accurately and consistently than ever before.

So how do you know what your FTP is? With the tools we have available to us today there are a couple of things you’ll want to do and look at to ensure your FTP is accurate. The first step is to produce threshold level efforts in training. The “field test” is a tried and true method, and usually the first step in setting your FTP. To perform the field test use the following protocol.

WARM UP

  • 20 minutes at endurance pace
  • 3×1 minute high cadence drills at 100 RPM w/ 1minute rest between each
  • 5 minutes at endurance pace

MAIN SET

  • 5 minute all out effort.
  • 10 minutes at endurance pace
  • 20 minute all out effort

COOL DOWN

  • 10-15 minutes easy

Once you’ve performed the FTP test, upload your data and analyze your performance. To calculate your FTP take 95 percent of your 20-minute, all-out effort. This will serve as a good approximation of your lactate threshold, and a strong baseline number for your training. However, while the field test is a strong indicator of FTP and a great place to start, physiological adaptation and performance is more nuanced than a simple 20-minute test.

The Power Duration Curve

WKO4 takes things a step further with the concept of modeled FTP (mFTP), which plots your performances across a curve and generates an mFTP based on historical efforts. Since everyone’s strength isn’t necessarily a 20-minute TT, the PD Curve can be a good way to gain insight into where you’re strongest, and what efforts you may need to focus on to elicit critical adaptations.

If you’re using mFTP and the PD Curve, it’s best to perform all-out efforts of varying durations anywhere from 30 seconds to one hour to get the most out of the “curve.” When establishing any power-based metric, the importance of valid and accurate data can’t be overstated. Power spikes and inaccurate data can drastically skew test results, and can even result in an inaccurate FTP or other power-derived metrics. Whether you’re using the field test, the PD Curve, or a combination of both, you’ll want to perform FTP level efforts four to six times a year so that your FTP is set correctly at key points in the season. It’s tools like this that make training with power so insightful!

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Establishing Power Zones

Now that you’ve determined your FTP, and understand what it is you need to do maintain an accurate threshold, you can calculate your training zones. Power-derived training zones are what you’ll use for every workout and ride to decipher how intense the ride was, and whether the planned intent of the ride or workout was achieved. Zones allow you to establish the appropriate intensity to induce the adaptation necessary for aerobic, metabolic, and muscular development. Power zones also further highlight the importance of an accurate and up to date FTP. There are several different zone structures available for athletes to use, but ultimately the more detailed and accurately the zones reflect your physiology the better. Below is one example of a seven zone format that can be used:

Zone 1 Active Recovery (AR) = < 55% of FTP

Zone 2 Endurance = 56%-75% of FTP

Zone 3 Tempo = 76%-90% of FTP

Zone 4 Lactate Threshold = 91%-105% of FTP

Zone 5 VO2max = 106%-120% of FTP

Zone 6 Anaerobic Capacity (AC) = 121%-150% of FTP

Zone 7 Neuromuscular Power (NP) = Maximal Power

If you’re using WKO4 you can also use Dr. Andy Coggan’s Individualized Power Levels that allow for an even more granular approach to workout prescription and ride analysis.

06148-how-to-get-started-training-with-power-fig21

Training with Power

The reason that you purchased a power meter is to enhance your training and improve your fitness. So, how do you go about training with power? The variations of workouts that can be performed are endless, but there are several key areas that you can focus on to elicit the greatest response.

SWEET SPOT

These efforts are performed at 88 percent to 94 percent of your FTP and are a great way to strengthen and build your FTP. Typically they’re performed earlier in the season, or mid-season to rebuild toward priority races. The duration of Sweet Spot intervals can vary depending on the athlete, but the goal should be to extend the duration and number of intervals throughout the season.

THRESHOLD-LEVEL

Threshold workouts are meant to directly improve your FTP and should be completed at 96 percent to 105 percent of your FTP. These should take you to your limit. Much like Sweet Spot intervals, the goal is to increase the length of time you can spend at this level. Typically these FTP-specific efforts build off the time you’ve spent training in your Sweet Spot.

STEADY STATE TEMPO

Tempo workouts are the foundation for most cyclists, especially those looking to increase muscular endurance and/or those training for longer endurance events. Tempo workouts occur between 76 percent and 88 percent of FTP, and should be long sustained efforts lasting anywhere from 30 minutes to two hours.

VO2MAX

These efforts are often the focus for traditional criterium and road racers looking to improve sprint and lead out performance. Lasting from three to eight minutes, they’re very challenging and should be planned for accordingly, as they require proper recovery upon completion of the workout. Depending on the duration of the interval, the intensity may range from 105 percent to 120 percent of FTP. These are valuable when matching race specificity for climbs, sprints, etc.

Analyzing and Tracking Training

Power-based training is only as good as you and/or your coach’s ability to track and analyze it! To get the benefits of training with a power meter you have to analyze your workouts and chart your progress over time. Again, the beauty of training and racing with power is our ability to quantify the effort and assign values to it. Here a some key areas to focus on when it comes to analysis:

  • Analyze your training to measure progress and understand what prescription is necessary to move you toward your goals. How did a particular workout go? How did you feel? Comparing the qualitative with the quantitative is not only good practice, but it’s how you improve and learn more about yourself as an athlete.
  • Review race files to understand if your training has been impactful. The goal of training for the majority of athletes is to prepare for race day. There’s more to race day than just fitness, but understanding your performance is a start.Take the time to perform an in-depth review of races to look for valuable insights that can also help inform your training moving forward.
  • Use the Performance Management Chart (PMC) to track your buildup to priority races. Paying careful attention to training load, ramp rate and fatigue will ensure you’re not overtraining, and will also help you peak for race day.
  • Pay special attention to Chronic Training Load (CTL), Acute Training Load (ATL) and Training Stress Balance (TSB) to take full advantage of training with power. These core metrics allow you to keep your finger on the pulse of your training. They’re invaluable for properly structuring training blocks, and being prepared for priority races.

Key Metrics

Often times the barrier to entry for athletes that are new to training with power can be the learning curve as it relates to power-based metrics. Yes, it’s true that there are a lot of metrics and numbers that an athlete can pay attention to, but here a some of the most important ones:

WATTS PER KILOGRAM (W/KG)

All things equal, the rider with the highest W/Kg will be the fastest. Simply put, it is how much power you produce per kilogram of body weight. The higher the number is, the stronger you’ll be.

NORMALIZED POWER (NP)

Due to the inherently variable nature of cycling, NP is a better representation of how metabolically challenging a workout was. It takes carbohydrate burning power surges into account and thus highlights the overall fatigue of the ride better than average power.

INTENSITY FACTOR (IF)

IF is the ratio of the Normalized Power of a ride to your FTP. Think of IF as a snapshot of how intense (hard) a workout or ride was. You can use this metric to understand if your perceived effort matched the actual intensity, and if you were on target for the workout.

TRAINING STRESS SCORE (TSS)

TSS measures the total workload of a ride. TSS quantifies how much work was done, and thus how much recovery is needed. Training Stress Score is important to track over time because it drives both fitness and fatigue, which in turn tells you how prepared for a race you are.

PEAK POWER

Tracking your peak power numbers for key durations will help you not only see how you’re improving, but also ensure your training is matching the demands of your racing. As a rule of thumb if you’re focused on shorter and more intense races you should see higher peak powers for shorter durations, and more endurance focused athletes should focus on longer durations.

Training with power, no matter the ride or race, is extremely valuable to athletes at all levels. The ability to quantify and track efforts, as well as to make individualized training prescriptions ensures that you’re getting the most out of your training time. There’s a lot that goes into training successfully with a power meter, but in the end if you grasp a few basic concepts you’ll be ready to begin. Make sure your FTP is accurate and take the time to review and analyze both your workouts and races. Successful athletes are always looking to improve, and training with power is the best way to make sure it happens.

Ready to dive deeper into the world of power-based training? Download our free ebook, “How to Start Training with Power” now!   

Source: How to Get Started Training with Power | TrainingPeaks



Stages Cycling now shipping GPS head unit and training software

BOULDER, Colo. (BRAIN) — Stages Cycling is now shipping Stages Dash and Stages Link — a GPS bike head unit and a cloud-based training software system, respectively. Both products were announced last year.Stages Dash retails for $399. Unlike other GPS head units, the Dash is designed specifically to help cyclists train with power meters, including Stages Power cranks and other devices. The Dash allows extensive customization of data fields, guided workout coaching and access to training metrics.

Source: Stages Cycling now shipping GPS head unit and training software



Stages Flight – The Best Indoor Cycling Experience in the World

 

Stages Indoor Cycling 2017 from Stages Cycling on Vimeo.

This video brings tears to my eyes everytime I watch it!

So many people on the Stages Cycling and VismoX teams have worked so hard and believe so strongly in this product.  Stages Flight and Stages Indoor Cycling bikes provide the best indoor cycling experience in the world.

When I’m old and gray, maybe I should say grayer, and I look back at my life, my boys, Seth and Christian will always be considered my greatest accomplishment.  I believe, Stages Flight will be second on that list.

 

 

 

 

 

 



Stages Cycling acquires VismoX Group Cycling software platform

Stages Cycling has announced the acquisition of a Norwegian developed group cycling software platform dubbed VismoX, something that the firm

Stages Cycling has announced the acquisition of a Norwegian developed group cycling software platform dubbed VismoX, something that the firm already handled global distribution for.

VismoX is the software at the heart of Stages Flight, the suite of comprehensive indoor cycling experiences and management tools. Stages Flight features web-based club and instructor tools for the creation, scheduling, and management of Stages Flight classes, as well as participant accounts with user histories and community engagement. All of this is powered by in-studio software and hardware featuring precise power measurement and ANT+ capabilities to deliver an engaging, dynamic, and immersive indoor cycling experience.

“At Stages Cycling we’re focused 100% on cycling. Our goal is to help commercial studios create the best cycling experience possible and to help their members be their best – the acquisition of VismoX builds on our ability to do just that,” says Jim Liggett, CEO of Stages Cycling. “We now have the capability to offer our customers an industry-leading ecosystem that is unrivaled.”

“We depend on Stages Cycling to provide innovative products and technology that help us create a unique and exhilarating cycling experience for our members,” says Christian Mason, Managing Director of Virgin Active South East Asia. “The combination of Stages Flight and Stages indoor bikes is a proven winner for us. We’re excited to see what the Stages team comes up with next.”

Stages Cycling also announced record-setting Q1 financial results, posting 163% growth in 2016. Strong sales of Stages SC studio bikes and global deployment of the Stages Flight group cycling platform contributed to the firm’s strong financial performance.

Source: Stages Cycling acquires VismoX Group Cycling software platform



Stages Indoor Cycling Announces Acquisition of VismoX Group Cycling Platform

Stages Indoor Cycling announces the completion of the acquisition of VismoX, a group cycling software platform.

Portland, OR — Stages® Indoor Cycling is pleased to announce the completion of the acquisition of VismoX. VismoX is an advanced group cycling software platform originally developed by Virtual Cycling AS of Norway. Stages is the leader in using power data to inform and inspire athletes’ performances, with a range of indoor bikes and indoor cycling software, as well as power meters, GPS units, and coaching software for outdoor cycling. Stages has been the global distributor for VismoX and the acquisition is effective immediately.

VismoX is the software at the heart of Stages Flight, the unrivaled suite of comprehensive indoor cycling experiences and management tools. Stages Flight features web-based club and instructor tools for the creation, scheduling, and management of Stages Flight classes as well as participant accounts with user histories and community engagement.  All of this is powered by in-studio software and hardware featuring precise power measurement and ANT+ capabilities to deliver the most engaging, dynamic, and immersive indoor cycling experience in the industry.

“At Stages Cycling we’re focused 100% on cycling. Our goal is to help commercial studios create the best cycling experience possible and to help their members be their best – the acquisition of VismoX builds on our ability to do just that,” says Jim Liggett, CEO of Stages Cycling. “We now have the capability to offer our customers an industry-leading ecosystem that is unrivaled.”

“We depend on Stages Cycling to provide innovative products and technology that help us create a unique and exhilarating cycling experience for our members,” says Christian Mason, Managing Director of Virgin Active South East Asia. “The combination of Stages Flight and Stages indoor bikes is a proven winner for us. We’re excited to see what the Stages team comes up with next.”

Stages Cycling also announced record-setting Q1 financial results. Stages Indoor Cycling is the fastest growing indoor fitness equipment company in the world with 163% growth in 2016. Strong sales of Stages SC studio bikes and global deployment of the Stages Flight group cycling platform contributed to their strong financial performance.

–end —

Stages Cycling LLC, with offices in Portland, OR and Boulder CO, launched the Stages Power meter in 2012, immediately making waves in the power measurement category. Stages has expanded into the commercial and home fitness categories with the SC3 commercial indoor cycling bike, with groundbreaking features designed to improve rider experience and increase durability.  In 2016, Stages completed the outdoor power training ecosystem with Stages Dash, a performance GPS head unit, and Stages Link, a cloud-based training service, guiding athletes to their best performances on the road and indoors through easy analytics, education, and custom coaching. More information at stagescycling.com

 

Source: Stages Indoor Cycling Announces Acquisition of VismoX Group Cycling Pl



Stages Power Meter – Shit or Legit



Stages launches complete power training ‘ecosystem’ with Stages Dash and Stages Link – Cycling Weekly

Stages goes live with new Dash computer and Link platform that promises to guide athletes to their best performance

Stages made waves in the power meter market for the its relatively cost effective, minimalistic and easy to use Stages crank based, single sided power meter.

It brought power readings to many who didn’t want to splash £1000 plus on a power meter.

Stages provides power meters most notably to Team Sky, but to a mix of off-road and track cycling professionals too.

The American brand wants to own the complete training experience and believes it can deliver a package that’ll improve you as an athlete with the help of the Stages Dash unit and Stage Link platform – along with its Stages power meter – that will be available to buy from June 19.

Stages Dash

The Dash computer is a ‘performance training’ GPS head unit that allows for both portrait and landscape view. The Stages Dash computer is designed to help coach a rider, according to the American brand.

It offers customisation of data fields – between one to 16 different fields per screen can be displayed, as well as a split screen view, which can show prescribed workouts alongside real-time metrics during your ride.

>>> A buyer’s guide to cycle computers

This split screen means the unit can guide you through training sessions which can be downloaded to the Dash via Stages Link and will prompt you through effort times and power and/or heart rate zones.

Bluetooth and ANT + connectivity is standard and allows Stages Power and other third party devices to connect to the unit as well as phone connectivity too.

GPS will sort speed out and Stages says it will look to include breadcrumb-style guidance in the near future, but this is a purely performance base unit. You can buy the Stages Dash via authorised retailers for £349.

In use the unit feels robust, the simple two-tone screen is easy to read, and you can easily change between different activity and data screens.

During testing we had pre production models and worked closely with Stages to iron out bugs and small issues. I was very impressed with how quickly it dealt with any niggles, and the company promises to constantly update firmware to ensure smooth running of the Stages Dash unit. A full review will follow.

Stages Link

Stages Link is, well, the link to the entire ‘ecosystem’. Link is a cloud-based coaching, education, training analysis and equipment management tool, which Stages developed with coaching experts Today’s Plan. This is the exciting part of Stages’s next step.

The online platform adapts to your needs, ability and time, and you don’t need to know your power numbers or threshold stats to get this program to work – though of course if you do know your numbers, it’ll help you to fully focus your training and zones. Link allows you to work through exercises to find out your power zones or heart rate zones.

This is an automated but adaptable system that moves with you whilst you train and get fitter.

Stages

Stages will provide a detailed six or 12 week plan specifically for a race or just to get fitter in a set time

When setting up the program it’ll ask you some simple questions: the type of rider you are, how many hours you train, what you are training for and whether you use power, heart rate or both. It’ll work out a program for you to follow with detailed sessions to best use your time.

Stages Link can show you how hard you are working under Performance on the Link web page. This shows you a graph over a set period and shows you in detail your training load.

Stages

As you can see from my Performance graph, I’m very well rested (maybe I should ride my bike some more)

You can use Link to manage both your Dash and your power meter, and it can be linked to external parties like Strava and Training Peaks.

Being web based you can access if from anywhere, giving you total control of how you train and use your data.

Riders who purchase Stages Power or Stages Dash will receive complementary access to Stages Link for two months. If you’d like to continue the program it’ll cost you £15 per month or £149 per yea. A free service is available, but will not include some of the main coaching features.

 

Source: Stages launches complete power training ‘ecosystem’ with Stages Dash and Stages Link – Cycling Weekly

 



First Full Psycle Cycling Studio in Texas to open at Market Street – The Woodlands

 

THE WOODLANDS, TX (May 31, 2017) – Full Psycle, a rhythm-based indoor cycling experience, will be opening its doors at Market Street – The Woodlands in summer, 2017 near H-E-B.  Full Psycle chose Market Street to debut their first Texas location.

The Full Psycle experience incorporates an exhilarating 45-minute full-body cycling workout from start to finish, where riders can expect to burn between 550-900 calories. Riders navigate hills, flats and intervals while moving to the beat of the music with weights.  Co-founders PK Harmeling and Shelly Scott created Full Psycle’s proprietary workout to incorporate three distinct components – live performance tracking, choreography/rhythm riding, and resistance training designed to tone abs, triceps, shoulders, biceps and back.

Classes offer different modes that allow fellow riders to race one another, beat personal records, and follow along to the beat and watch live music and festival videos.  Results are emailed instantly following the ride and performance is tracked in your online account, allowing riders to experience progress and set goals.

In addition to the cycling studio with 40 bikes, Full Psycle will feature workout apparel shop, locker rooms with key-coded lockers; men’s and women’s showers fully stocked with shampoo, conditioner, body wash and lotion by Intelligent Nutrients and a chilled filtered water bottle filling station.  Full Psycle rides are $22 each, and discounted monthly and yearly packages are available.

For additional information, visit http://www.fullpsycle.com.



One-On-One With Flywheel Sports CEO Sarah Robb O’Hagan

SGB spoke with Sarah Robb O’Hagan, CEO of Flywheel Sports, one of the nation’s fastest growing indoor cycling brands, about the company’s introduction of at-home bikes and streaming workout classes as well as the burgeoning growth prospects for Flywheel and the boutique fitness industry.



How Operators Can Use Technology to Move Their Health Clubs Forward

The 2016 Motionsoft Technology Summit delivered four key takeaways that can help health club operators improve operations and increase revenue, according to Motionsoft Chief Strategy Officer Al Noshirvani.

Source: How Operators Can Use Technology to Move Their Health Clubs Forward



Fitness Trackers Are Terrible At Counting Calories

A fitness wearable promises to aid you in your quest for a healthier life by providing data on how your body responds to physical activity. They’re good at providing some bits of information and not so good at others. In particular, a new small-scaled study from Stanford University suggests that fitness trackers are not great at measuring calories burned.

Read More at –  Fitness Trackers Are Terrible At Counting Calories



West Village Neighbors Sue Equinox Gym Over ‘Ear Splitting’ Noise

Neighbors of a West Village Equinox say the gym produces constant and “ear splitting” noise.

Source: West Village Neighbors Sue Equinox Gym Over ‘Ear Splitting’ Noise



A bunch of cycling enthusiasts just helped Peloton raise $325 million – betting it could be ‘the Apple of fitness’

Hollis Johnson Peloton, the indoor fitness company, has raised $325 million from investors including Wellington Management, Fidelity Investments, Kleiner Perkins

Source: A bunch of cycling enthusiasts just helped Peloton raise $325 million – betting it could be ‘the Apple of fitness’

 

 




 

SoulCycle

 

Click the link below for a BIG surprise.

Source: SoulCycle




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